100 years ago – January 24, 1918 from the Cambridge City Tribune

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Germantown Items – School will be closed for one week on account of coal shortage.
Milton Items – A snow drift near Mr. Shafer’s, east of town, was reported intact Saturday. It was nine feet high.
American stock breeders are being asked to conserve their flocks and herds in order to meet Europe’s tremendous demands for meats during the war and likely for many years afterward.
If one-half of the money spent by the government on waste basket advertising was applied to coal, it would fill every bunker of our navy.
The blizzard of Saturday week killed many hogs and chickens here and there, we learn. It required the best protection of live stock against the wind and cold, and where this was neglected, there was much suffering and loss of life.
The most dramatic order ever issued by the United States was that of Thursday, which suspended operation for five days beginning Friday morning of every manufacturing enterprise, with few exceptions, east of the Mississippi River. By this order it was expected to conserve 30,000,000 tons of bituminous coal, or about half of the shortage.
The Cambridge City independent basketball team will battle against the Lewisville independents at Community Hall tonight. The promise is for a fast game as Lewisville has not been beaten but once and that was by the Cambridge City quintet. The lineup is as follows: Cambridge City, E Porter, C Porter forwards, Sutton center and Winters, Watson, and Diffenderfer guards. The home boys have not lost a game this season and expect the loyal support of the people.
Great credit is due the Mal-Gra people for the generous manner in which they have come forward when their fellow citizens were in dire need or when the town needed fuel to keep the fires going under the boilers at the electric light plant. Bertsch & Co., the Paul Casket Co., The Standard, National Drill, and other factories of the town have been very thoughtful of the conditions of their neighbors and were not backward with anything that would make them comfortable.
Courtesy of the Cambridge City Library History Room